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What Is Fentanyl?

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OPIATES ARE BOTH PHYSICALLY AND PSYCHOLOGICALLY ADDICTIVE, MEANING THAT YOU CAN DEAL WITH SEVERE WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS WHEN YOU STOP USING. AS YOUR TOLERANCE BUILDS, IT CAN BECOME DIFFICULT TO AFFORD THE NUMBER OF OPIATES YOU NEED TO AVOID WITHDRAWAL. MANY TIMES, PRESCRIPTION OPIATE ABUSE TRANSITIONS TO EXPERIMENTING WITH HARDER DRUGS, LIKE HEROIN AND FENTANYL. BUT, WHAT IS FENTANYL?

The opiate epidemic has led to a public health emergency declaration, with drug overdoses becoming the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. As many as 1 in every 7 adults in the United States struggle with a substance abuse problem. Vicodin and OxyContin are opiates among the most commonly prescribed medications. This is why many turn to an opioid addiction treatment program.

WHAT IS FENTANYL?

So, what is fentanyl? Fentanyl is a powerful prescription opiate that treats severe and traumatic pain. It comes in various forms, including patches, lollipops, and pills. Fentanyl is not only highly addictive but is more than 100 times more powerful than heroin. This causes your brain to release excessive amounts of dopamine, which leads to feelings of euphoria.

Fentanyl is a lab created drug that can be used to cut heroin. The drug is often times linked to a heroin addiction. This leads to a significantly higher risk of overdose and death.

Signs of fentanyl abuse or addiction include:

  • Taking more fentanyl than prescribed
  • Having to increase how much you use to experience the same euphoric high
  • Experiencing physical withdrawal symptoms when you quit using
  • Acquiring fentanyl illegally, such as through black markets
  • Spending the majority of your time or money buying or using fentanyl
  • Avoiding friends or family in order to use fentanyl

HOW IS FENTANYL ADDICTION TREATED?

Now that you understand what is fentanyl, you may wonder how fentanyl addiction is treated. Using fentanyl, your brain begins associating it with pleasure, rewarding you with excessive neurotransmitters when you use.

When you stop using, you can experience physical withdrawal symptoms such as sweats, tremors, restless legs and cravings. Treatment can offer you a supportive, safe environment to detox. With the use of medications and other therapies, withdrawal symptoms can become significantly less intense when you attend treatment.

You can choose to enroll in an inpatient or outpatient treatment. Inpatient treatment is residential, meaning you stay there 24 hours a day, 7 days a week until you complete the program. Inpatient is best for severe addictions or if you have attempted treatment before.

Outpatient treatments are less demanding but can meet anywhere from 3 days a week to 7 days a week. Both inpatient and outpatient programs offer evidence-based and holistic treatments.

CONTACT PEARL OF THE SEA RETREAT TODAY FOR HELP

Take the first step by seeking recovery for addiction. Pearl of the Sea Retreat, which has the premier opioid addiction treatment program in St. Augustine, FL., is here to help. Call us today at 866-962-1907 to learn more about your treatment options.

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